Good Luck Charms That Inspire Positivity: A Comprehensive Guide

Good Luck Charms That Inspire Positivity: A Comprehensive Guide

Around St. Patrick’s Day, we all want to attract the “luck of the Irish” – it’s impossible to resist the idea of a mystical boost of positive energy. However, Ireland isn’t the only country with a history of celebrating serendipitous symbols. Good-fortune totems have been around for so long, across so many cultures, that today they’re some of the most treasured designs in the world. In ancient times, lucky “charms” were originally spiritual blessings bestowed by priests or songs that were sung to ward off evil. Later, mystics became convinced that solid objects would bring more permanent good fortune – and tangible good-luck talismans caught on fast.

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Almost any object can be used as a lucky charm. Coins and buttons are common choices, as are souvenirs of a memorable trip or occasion. Some people swear by a pair of lucky socks or a sports jersey. No matter the form, incorporating a good-luck symbol into your wardrobe or home can be fun and motivating – and a touchstone for positive energy. Although wearing one of these magical symbols may not guarantee a win at Powerball, they’re steeped in centuries of positive energy to propel you toward your hopes and dreams. Check out the history of their meanings and select one (or more!) to inspire that little bit ‘o extra luck… Shamrock Today, shamrocks (also known as clovers) compete with leprechauns and green beer as the hallmarks of St. Patrick’s Day. However, the idea of “rolling in clover” actually predates St. Pat, the so-called Apostle of Ireland. Mentions of the hearty green plants as totems of good luck appear in centuries-old legends surrounding the ancient Druids (Celtic priests) who believed that carrying a shamrock – even the three-leaf variety –helped them to see when evil spirits were coming, and therefore be able to escape from harm’s way. Due to its rarity, the four leaf clover was believed to contain even more magical power. The chances of finding one of these plant-world mutants rival casino odds: There is one four leaf clover to every 10,000 three leafers. Each leaf in the clover symbolizes good omens for faith, hope, love, and luck for the finder. Capture the zest of prosperity with a pair of Four Leaf Clover Hook Earrings. Horseshoe Ever wonder what that marshmallow horseshoe is doing in your bowl of Lucky Charms cereal? This auspicious symbol dates back to Egyptian iconography, used to deflect evil and bring good fortune. When the idea of superstition was first introduced in northern Europe, most likely by wandering Celtic tribes, horseshoes were hung above doorways in order to ward off evil goblins and mischievous fairies roaming the woods. The shoes were said to resemble the Celtic moon god’s crescent symbol, and their power came from the fact they were crafted with the lucky elements of iron and fire. The rule? Hang the totem with the two ends pointed up, so the horseshoe collects luck like a bowl. Horses are also powerful symbols in feng shui, believed to attract prosperity and good luck into the home – and when horseshoes are hung over northwest- or west-facing doors, it is especially favorable. Catch your own lucky vibes with the Fortune’s Favor Expandable Necklace. Found Coins “Find a penny, pick it up. All day long, you'll have good luck”. You’ve heard the rhyme, now what’s the story? Before paper bills, credit cards or Venmo, metal coins were used as currency – and carried the mystique of wealth and abundance. When metal was scarce, people revered a found coin as a gift from the gods, believing the shiny substance would protect them from bad luck. Over time, the superstition became more nuanced: If you found a penny lying on the ground with the heads side up, you should pick it up for good luck. If the coin was tails-up, it should be turned over for another person to retrieve later. Thanks to inflation, it may not seem worthwhile to stop and reach for something that will make you $.01 richer. However, before you walk away, consider this: The winner of this year’s Daytona 500, Austin Dillon, carried a lucky penny in his car – given to him by a young fan.Feathers To Native Americans, who believe that all animals have souls, even the lightest feather carries heavy symbolic weight. Ancient tribesman believed that when a feather falls to earth it is a serendipitous gift that carries a message from above and transmits energy from its bird of origin. Around the world, feathers from the brilliantly colored kingfisher – said to be the first bird released from Noah’s ark – are considered the luckiest of all. It’s believed that a person who carries its feather will receive protection from harm and invite good fortune. Embrace the legend of the lucky feather with the Feather Precious Threads Bracelet. Jade Ancient China’s imperial gem is the feng shui stone of luck, used for centuries as a talisman to attract health and good fortune. Jade is believed to have a strong chi that radiates through your body when you wear it, providing wisdom, energy – and eventually, achievement. Plus, the smooth, sea-green stone is the color of money – a natural attractor of wealth and success in business. In the Americas, the Aztecs and Mayans considered jade a stone of magic, valued even more than gold. It was thought that the striking material dispelled negativity and provided protection from one’s enemies. Today Jade is one of the most common good luck charms that people take to Las Vegas, with totems ranging from jade pendants to small frogs (another symbol of prosperity). Evil Eye Sometimes, protection from bad luck is as important as attracting good luck. Such is the case with this universally-revered amulet, believed to protect its wearer against curses cast by the malevolent glare. Also known as the “lucky eye,” the symbol can be traced back 5,000 years to clay tablets in Mesopotamia. The design exists in Jewish, Christian and Muslim cultures as well as Buddhist and Hindu societies. In the arid climate of Turkey, where water is a precious commodity that makes things prosper and grow, the most popular evil eye color is blue, which represents the clear blue hue of fresh water. Our Evil Eye Cuff offers a sleek, updated take on this classic lucky charm. To peruse more iconic charms full of meaning, and to find your #SymbolRightNow, browse through our Symbol Wall. Written by Joanna Powell